ALL ORDERS PLACED TODAY WILL SHIP MONDAY, AUGUST 29TH, 2022

FREE sewing Instructions for our FogFender Face Mask™

FREE sewing Instructions for our FogFender Face Mask™

Still in need of a mask? You've come to the right place! We're offering a free mask pattern for anyone who needs one. As makers, we are happy to help in this small way during the Covid-19 pandemic. 

For this project, we partnered with fellow maker, Bob McNally, from 
strumstick.com. He has been instrumental in co-designing this mask with ColorUpLife and we thank him immensely for his creativity and talent. We created this design early in the pandemic because we recognized the need for it. Many people who wear glasses resist wearing masks because of this fogging issue, people like us!. Our ability to produce this mask is limited, so we are sharing these instructions with anyone who wishes to make one. For independent makers, feel free to produce, modify, and sell the finished masks in your Etsy store or on your website.

*** Remember, cloth masks are NOT medical grade face coverings. They are intended to reduce the chance of the wearer acquiring or spreading viruses in essential social settings such as grocery stores. They are also meant to conserve the medical grade masks for critical services. Thank you for doing your part by wearing a mask. ***


Materials you'll need:

  • 13" X 9½" piece of 100% cotton, medium weave broadcloth. The 13" should be cut across the length (tight grain) of the fabric and the 9½" cut on the width (stretchy grain). See diagram below. The finished mask will be a double layer of this cloth. Note: We have found that very tight weaved fabrics such as batiks may be less effective at reducing fogging.
  • Two 6" pieces of ¼" wide elastic.
  • Thread to match.
  • Note: If greater size adjustment is desired, 4 ties made from ¼" twill tape can be substituted for the elastic. Recommended length for each tie is 18".
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Fabric orientation


    Step-by-step sewing instructions:


    Step 1:
    Iron a ¼" double fold along each 9½" edge and stitch.

    Step 2:
    Iron a ¼" single fold on each of the 13" edges. Do Not Stitch.

    Step 3:
    Fold fabric in half bringing the hemmed 9" edges together with the right (front) side of the fabric facing out.

    Step 4:
    Insert one piece of the elastic ¼" deep between the two sewn seams at one corner as shown below.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 4

    Step 5:
    Top stitch close to edge over these 3 layers and down the now 6" side of the fabric, stopping ½" from the end and backstitch. (This 1 ½" space is reserved for the other end of the elastic later).Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 5

    Step 6:
    Repeat step 4 and 5 on the other 6" end.

    Step 7:
    Fold top hem (with the elastics sticking out) down 1½" and press. We will call this THE 1½" CREASE.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 7

    Step 7:
    Fold top hem (with the elastics sticking out) down 1½" and press. We will call this THE 1½" CREASE.

    Step 8:
    Rotate the piece 90 degrees and fold so the elastics are together and press. We will call this THE CENTER FOLD CREASE.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 8

    Step 9:
    Place 2 pins in the hems that holds the elastics, each 2" from THE CENTER FOLD CREASE.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 9

    Step 10:
    On THE 1½" CREASE, insert pins on both sides ½" from THE CENTER FOLD CREASE.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 10

    Step 11:
    Starting at one corner of the top hem, stitch close to the edge, turning (with the needle down) at each pin or angle on the diagram. Remember you need to backstitch at the beginning and end. This stitch line creates the fog-reducing pockets.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 11

    Step 12:
    Starting at the top, make 3 staggered fan folds (as shown) so the folded fabric measures 2". Press, then pin or tape 1" from each edge to hold the folds in place.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 12

    Step 13:
    Begin stitching the folds, close to the edge, over the previous stitch line, stopping ½" from the beginning with the needle down. Carefully insert the free end of the elastic (without twisting it) into the opening at the end of the fan that you created in step 5. Continue to sew, backstitching over the elastic then stopping at the corner with the needle down. Rotate the mask 90 degrees and sew 3 stitches, along the bottom edge, toward the center of the mask. Rotate again, 90 degrees, to sew back up the fanned fabric, backstitching at the top. This creates a second stitch row along the pleated edge. Repeat on the other end of the fan.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 13

    Step 14:
    Your mask is now complete.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 14

    Step 15:
    If you are wearing glasses, insert tissue or cotton balls into the pockets at the top on either side of the mask center. Try on the mask and adjust the padding in the pockets for comfort and fog reduction. We find that pushing the padding down and toward the outer edges of the pockets may be the best position to start with.
    Face mask pattern by ColorUpLife: Image for step 15
    If you're still in need of a cloth face covering or would like to purchase a FogFender before making one yourself, we still have many options available. Please visit the clearance section of our website.

    Thank you and stay well,
    -Karyn & Sandi



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